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Peptic Ulcer


About
Peptic Ulcers are open sores on the stomach lining or small intestine. Burning or pain in the stomach is often indicative of a peptic ulcer. Nausea, vomiting, itching, headaches, lower back pain, or choking may also be indicators.


Notes
  • Make sure you are taking supplements for overall good health. If you are not taking these basic supplements, we recommend Enfuz from Vitabase. When you take a small packet of pills each day, you get all the basic nutrition you need. Each packet contains a multi-vitamin, CoQ10 (for heart health), Omega 3, Vitamin D-3, a probiotic, and a powerful set of antioxidants to help your body fight off disease.
  • A breath test, blood test, or biopsy of the stomach lining can help determine the presence of H. pylori, which is sometimes found in those with stomach ulcers. Should test be positive, your physician may prescribe antibiotics to help treat this problem.
  • Do not consume alcohol if you are taking cimetidine (Tagamet) or ranitidine (Zantac).
  • Healing of peptic ulcers is possible when treated properly. Total healing may not result until at least 8 weeks have passed.
  • Kool-Aid tests work to identify stomach ulcers. After drinking two glasses of Kool-Aid with extra sugar, the person performs a urine test. The results are as follows: the person with undigested sugar in his urine has an ulcer. Normal results (no undigested sugar in the urine) means that no stomach leak, and thus no ulcer, is present.
  • Observe your eating habits to see if food allergies may be causing the ulcer.
  • Omeprazole (Prilosec) and clarithromycin (Biaxin) are often used to treat H. pylori infection and duodenal ulcers. Due to their negative side effects, these medications should only be used for short periods of time.
  • Over-the-counter drugs and prescribed medications may offer temporary relief of symptoms, but they should not be used for long periods of time. If used regularly, they may actually be harmful in the healing process.
  • Peptic ulcers and gastro esophageal reflux disease (GERD) share similar symptoms. More cases of GERD, which is less serious, are diagnosed.
  • Proper treatment can help heal most peptic ulcers.
  • Upper GI tests and endoscopies are used to find peptic ulcers.
  • Use antacids in moderation. Do not take any products that have aluminum in them. Avoid products that cause strange side effects.
  • Your doctor may decide to do a biopsy on your stomach if your ulcer won't heal in order to make sure you don't have cancer.


Advice
  • Avoid consuming cow's milk as it may actually boost acid production. Soy, rice, and almond milk are acceptable.
  • Avoid smoke and smoking.
  • Consuming a big glass of water can help ease pain immediately because it helps dilute stomach acid and helps the body move the acid through the system.
  • Do not drink hot beverages like hot tea or coffee.
  • Do not use aspirin or ibuprofen.
  • Freshly made cabbage juice is beneficial when consumed right after juicing.
  • Limit consumption of refined carbohydrates as they may contribute to peptic ulcers.
  • Maintain regular bowel movements in order to have a healthy, clean colon. Cleansing enemas can be beneficial.
  • Manage stress well or avoid it altogether. Stress management techniques include meditation and music therapy.
  • Organic baby foods or vegetables that have been steamed and blended are good for those with bleeding ulcers. Guar gum and psyllium seed are easily-digested fibers.
  • Smaller meals eaten more frequently throughout the day are better than large meals and are easier on the stomach. Well-cooked millet, raw goat's milk, well-cooked rice, yogurt, kefir, and cottage cheese are recommended. Alfalfa juice, barley, and wheat provide chlorophyll to promote healing of ulcers.
  • Soft foods are recommended when experiencing severe symptoms. The following foods are beneficial: yams, avocados, potatoes, bananas, and squash. Well-steamed broccoli and carrots are acceptable every once in a while. Vegetables may have to go through the blender before you eat them.
  • Stay away from all coffee and alcohol.
  • Stay away from salt and sugar as they cause more stomach acid to be produced.
  • Stay away from tea, caffeine, chocolate, animal fats, fried foods, and carbonated beverages. Distilled water with lemon juice is beneficial and refreshing.
  • To aid in digestion, food should be chewed well. Consuming bitters may help with digestion, also. Before meals, take 10 to 15 drops under the tongue.
  • To get enough vitamin K, be sure to consume a lot of dark green leafy vegetables. This vitamin promotes healing.



Helpful nutrients for this condition.

Pectin
Importance: Moderate
Comments: Constructs protective lining in the intestines, alleviating duodenal ulcers.


L-glutamine
Importance: Moderate
Comments: Promotes healing of peptic ulcers.


Vitamin E
Importance: Moderate
Comments: Antioxidant. Decreases stomach acid. Alleviates pain. Helps with the healing process.



Helpful herbs and supplements for this condition.

Alfalfa
Type: Internal
Purposes: Provides vitamin K.

Aloe vera
Type: Internal
Purposes: Alleviates pain. Promotes healing.
Dosage: 4 ounces of food-grade gel or juice daily.

Bupleurum
Type: Internal
Purposes: Combine with angelica and licorice root. Helps with ulcers.

Angelica
Type: Internal
Purposes: Combine with bupleurum and licorice root. Helps with ulcers.

Licorice
Type: Internal
Purposes: Combine with angelica and bupleurum. Helps with ulcers.

Cat's Claw
Type: Internal
Purposes: Cleans out the digestive tract. Promotes healing.
Cautions: Pregnant women should not take cat's claw.

Comfrey
Type: Internal
Purposes: Promotes healing of ulcers.
Cautions: Only take comfrey under the close watch of your physician. Should only be used internally for less than one month.

Garlic
Type: Internal
Purposes: Kills microbes. Promotes healing of ulcers.

Hops
Type: Internal
Purposes: Encourages sleep. Best when taken with passionflower, skullcap, and valerian root.

Passionflower
Type: Internal
Purposes: Encourages sleep. Best when taken with hops, skullcap, and valerian root.

Skullcap
Type: Internal
Purposes: Encourages sleep. Best when taken with passionflower, hops, and valerian root.

Valerian Root
Type: Internal
Purposes: Encourages sleep. Best when taken with passionflower, skullcap, and hops.

Kava Kava
Type: Internal
Purposes: Eases stress. Promotes relaxation.

St. John's Wort
Type: Internal
Purposes: Eases stress. Promotes relaxation.

Licorice
Type: Internal
Purposes: Helps heal duodenal and gastric ulcers. A natural alternative to ranitidine and cimetidine for peptic ulcers.
Dosage: 750-1500 mg of deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), 2-3 times daily between meals for 8-16 weeks.
Cautions: Do not use regular licorice root - only deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL). Using regular licorice on a daily basis for more than a week can boost blood pressure. Those with high blood pressure should not take it.

Malva
Type: Internal
Purposes: Make into tea. Eases irritation in the intestines. Helps soothe stomach.

Marshmallow Root
Type: Internal
Purposes: Eases mucous membrane irritation.

Slippery Elm
Type: Internal
Purposes: Eases mucous membrane irritation.

Rhubarb
Type: Internal
Purposes: Helps with bleeding of the intestines.
Dosage: Juice or tablet.

Bayberry
Type: Internal
Purposes: Works well as a tea.

Catnip
Type: Internal
Purposes: Works well as a tea.

Chamomile
Type: Internal
Purposes: Works well as a tea.
Cautions: To avoid developing ragweed allergies, only use chamomile occasionally. Those with ragweed allergies should not use chamomile.

Goldenseal
Type: Internal
Purposes: Works well as a tea.
Cautions: Those with ragweed allergies, may experience a reaction to goldenseal. Pregnant or nursing women should not use goldenseal. Do not use a daily dose of goldenseal longer than one week as it can destroy intestinal flora.

Myrrh
Type: Internal
Purposes: Works well as a tea.

Sage
Type: Internal
Purposes: Works well as a tea.
Cautions: Those who experience seizures should not take sage.